Science in Society

Unintelligent Design: Uncovering Bias in Artificial Intelligence

Evan Wroe and Felix Opolka speak to Dr Jennifer Cobbe about the causes of bias in machine learning models and how the associated risks can be mitigated. We are in the midst of an artificial intelligence revolution. This might come as a surprise, since we have  been trained by science fiction to expect an artificial intelligence revolution in the form of malevolent automatons taking over our streets.  In reality, the

Going Deep to Reach the Stars

Tatjana Baleta explores the deep sea and its relationship to outer space. Sixty-two feet below the turquoise waters off Key Largo, Florida, a helmeted figure explores the sea floor with gentle bounding steps. This “aquanaut” is a member of NEEMO, the NASA Extreme Environment Mission Operations project, and has been living underwater for three weeks, training to one day be an astronaut in space. A vast expanse of the unknown,

FOCUS: Our Place in the Universe

Maeve Madigan, Philip Clarke and João Melo explain the central concepts behind the 2019 Physics Nobel Prize. The first half of the prize, awarded for the detection of a planet orbiting a star like our own, teaches us about our cosmological neighbourhood as it is today. The second half, awarded for research on the understanding of our cosmological history, teaches us about where the Universe as we know it came from.

DNA helix

From a female scientist to a scientist who was female – explored by Hannah Kossowska-Peck. Today we should not celebrate her for being a female scientist, nor a ‘feminist’ scientist, but an accomplished scientist. International Women’s Day is a time to focus on the wonderful women in society, both currently and historically. One such woman is Rosalind Franklin, who graduated from Newnham College, Cambridge in 1941 and went on to