Time Flies

Philip Myers tells us how scientists unravelled the secrets of time telling using the humble vinegar fly You cannot win a Nobel Prize if you are dead. Last year, the Nobel Prize for Physiology and Medicine was awarded for the ‘elucidation of the molecular mechanisms controlling circadian rhythms’, and the living received the credit. But some missed out – some who had passed away, who had been central to the

Medicine’s Forgotten Warriors

Laura Upstone tells the story of virus based medicine in the war against bacteria, the wonder drug that almost was In this age of modern medicine it is easy to
forget that only a century ago, an infected scratch from a bramble could have cost you your life. Alexander Fleming’s discovery of the first antibiotic – penicillin – opened up a wealth of opportunities. Now an infected cut is just a

Just Your Cup of Tea

Sophie Protheroe examines the global history of tea and its effect on our health Tea has become a quintessentially British symbol. As a nation, we have been drinking tea for over 350 years. However, tea has endured a tumultuous journey to reach its status as the nation’s favourite beverage. Originating in China, where it was thought to have medicinal properties, tea’s history is closely intertwined with the history of botany