2017

Tissue Engineering Scaffolds: Guiding the rise of Cell Therapies

Oran Maguire explains how engineering and cell biology are carving out a new field One of the most exciting fields to emerge in the life sciences and biotechnology in recent years is tissue engineering, which centers around creating a reliable supply of functional tissue that will not be rejected by potential transplantees. Yet if it is ever going to realise its goals in the clinic, tissue engineering will have to

How our experiences affect our children

Jiali Gao looks at what toad sex, a suicide and starvation have taught genetics The theory of evolution is up there with the ‘universal law of gravitation’ and the ‘theory of general relativity’ when it comes to popular science. Darwin and Lamarck’s famous historical showdown is ensconced in GCSE Science textbooks, with Darwin emerging as the heroic victor, whilst Lamarck’s work is relegated to history’s dumping ground for scientific theories

In Search of Quantum Gravity

In Search of Quantum Gravity Gianamar Giovannetti-Singh explores the holographic universe Modern fundamental physics consists of two major pillars; general relativity, describing the interactions between matter and spacetime at the largest scales imaginable, and quantum mechanics, the physics governing the behaviour of subatomic particles. Despite each respective theory being tested to an extraordinary degree of accuracy, they are fundamentally incompatible with each other – general relativity predicts continuous spacetime as

Does Your Brain Have a Sex?

Does your brain have a sex? Julia Gottwald shows us that human male and female brains are more similar than we think If you were a fruit fly and smelled male pheromones, you would show a strong and consistent response. As a female fly, you would engage in courtship behaviour; as a male fly, you would become more aggressive. We know that pheromones activate different clusters of neurons in the

Travel and Conservation – Steppes Beyond

Last weekend I attended a unique festival at the Royal Geographical Society, London, that presented talks and discussions by conservationists, explorers, travel experts, wildlife documentary presenters and producers. Hosted by Steppes Travel, their first ‘Beyond’ two-day festival aimed to inspire everyone to embark on adventures into the wilderness, whether on safaris to the plains of Africa or rambles getting lost in ones own back garden. The higher end of which is offered by Steppes: from snow leopard tracking in India to

Nature Matters 2016

Nature Matters 2016 By Simon Moore Two weekends ago I was in Cambridge for a New Networks for Nature meeting in the wonderful David Attenborough building, which brought together science and art to explore the way we relate to nature. Conservationists, ecologists and environmentalists were interspersed with poets, novelists, musicians and visual artists, to build up a picture of the diverse range of responses to the natural world, in order

Review: Before the Wilderness

Edited by Thomas Blackburn & Kat Anderson. Published by Malki Press-Ballena Press (1993) Its all too easy to get so lost in our busy urban lives surrounded by bright MacBook screens and concreted landscapes that we forget humid tropical rainforests and alpine mountain peaks really still exist outside of nature books and TV documentaries. Certainly, the idea that people who have never seen white skin and who rely on hunting